Massino Shot One of the Three Rebel Capos? Galante Was Bonanno Boss?

Does anyone believe either of those things in the headline are true? I assume I don't even need to write this post about NatGeo's "ITAM" -- I assume my readers would know better...

Comments

  1. I have come to the conclusion that NatGeo hired a fresh-out-of-the-box college graduate from South Dakota to put the facts together. Nothing they say on those shows add up to anything that was ever written in the books.

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    1. You're right, it was an amateurish effort.

      www.SonnysMobCafe.com

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  2. They should expose more the sicilian mafia i would find that more interesting then la cosa nostra

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    1. I agree. If only Mr. DeLucca were back - he was my Italian correspondent....

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    2. Try www.SonnysMobCafe.com Articles/Blog page. The first two stories are about 'Ndrangheta.

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  3. galante was only ever a captain in the bonnanos and massino didn't do any shooting in the 3 captains rubout , the main shooters were vito rizzuto and gerlando scascia

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    1. Galante was actually the underboss before he went to prison if I'm not mistaken. Either way, he was mean motherfucker lol

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  4. Well we certainly shouldn't forget the "old timer".

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  5. One thing they got right. They can try to bust it up, but there are more guys on the streets than they got a clue. Family's that have restructured and even rebirthed old areas they thought they thought were history. There's old timers, ones that kept quiet and hidden and don't tolerate jerk off half assed wiseguys or rats. There are camorristi, ndranghetisti and zips supporting bruised family's with a collective earning venture. Giuliani can snicker and laugh, alongside all those nine to fivers but Our thing will always be around.

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    1. you are 100% correct my friend

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  6. It might still be around, but it aint the same. No more neighborhoods, and no one cares about their own people and their own neighborhood. Case in point: Mulberry Street. Little Italy is going through gentrification. New landlords are buying the buildings and doubling commercial rents. Florios will be closing next month. Bella Ferrara lost their café and the bakery is set to close by the end of this year. SPQR is closed and the location will be used for a Christmas Tree Shop store. They are planning on opening a Starbucks on Mulberry Street. Giovanna's closed down.
    Puglia closed down it's bar. This is all due to rent increases. I know the food is lousy down there, but when the wiseguys were around, crap like this would never happen. I seen it in Bensonhurst, too. I guess it goes with the territory of being low key. But an organization that has to think twice to kill people can't really be feared. There are Mexicans out there who will kill to defend their honor and happily go to jail. I know they will never be in the same class as cosa nostra, but it's the mentality. A lot of guys flip today, because they can't do the time. They want to live the glory, but don't want to pay the price. The biggest joke is Staten Island.

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  7. To reply to the headline above, I don't think Massino shot one of the three capo's, no, but according to one account made by Salvatore Vitale he was however present and even smacked one of the victims to the ground before they were shot. It is quite possible that the men were held there for several minutes and weren't immediately killed. So there would have been enough time for Massino to stop by and give his "regards" to the traitors.

    Galante never was the boss of the Bonanno family, at least not officially. That title belonged to Phil Rastelli, a man who during the so called Banana war sided with the commission and thus still received there full support. Galante on the other hand stood at the other side and was loyal to the patriarch of the family, ever since he hooked up with the family. In the aftermath of the Banana war he found himself demoted and probably felt pretty pissed about it. Certainly because there was little he could do from behind bars. They reformed the organization and he was left out. Once out of jail Galante felt he was the rightful heir to the throne. He certainly got his chance when Rastelli himself was shortly after imprisoned. He sure as hell wasn't about to wait for the commission to carry on. Why would he? The man was a living legend amongst the Bonanno's. Many youngsters looked up to the guy. Above all, he didn't care about the commission. He hated the Gambino's, especially Dellacroce, and hated the Luccheses. However, Galante's close ties to the Sicilian faction made him a dangerous individual. He also held Salvatore Catalano behind his sleeves, who was an important key figure of the Pizza Connection. Galante was in a power position, but shouldn't have messed with the Gambino's. The Bonanno's simply were to divided for all of them to back Galante. Even the Sicilians, in the end, agreed to get rid of him.

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    1. He smacked Phil Giaccone, who had once been Joe's Capo. Seems there were a lot of hard feelings toward Giaccone who was capo to many of the family's later leaders, including the current street boss...

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