Cadillac Frank Pleads NOT Guilty; DeLuca Flipped


Headline corrected; story expanded
Francis "Cadillac Frank" Salemme has pleaded not guilty to the 1993 murder of Boston nightclub owner Steven DiSarro.

Salemme, 83, copped to the charge on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Boston.

Rhode Island ex-mobster Robert "Bobby" DeLuca cooperated with investigators, according to an affidavit, which also noted that DeLuca had implicated Salemme in the murder.

Paul Weadick pleaded not guilty last week.

Rhode Island mobster Robert “Bobby” DeLuca, who interestingly was quick to label a rival mobster an informant, gave the Fed's Cadillac Frank's head on a silver platter, as it turned out.
DeLuca began cooperating in June after he was indicted for obstruction and making false statements regarding his knowledge about DiSarro’s disappearance, according to testimony by a Massachusetts state trooper, the Boston Globe reported.
Anthony “The Saint” St. Laurent went away for extorting bookmakers and attempting to hire a hit man on three different occasions to gun-down DeLuca.

The Saint wanted DeLuca killed because DeLuca had called him a government informant. 

St. Laurent Sr., 73, of Johnston, is due out of prison next month.

Cadillac Frank


According to the Globe, DeLuca told investigators that he and his brother helped Salemme dispose of DiSarro’s body in Providence after Salemme’s late son and associate Paul Weadick strangled him. This was based on information provided by state trooper John Fanning.

Salemme, 83, was living in Atlanta under a new name before he fled when police came looking for him.
He was arrested while staying at a Connecticut last month.
Salemme pleaded not guilty yesterday to DiSarro’s murder and is being held without bail.

Read about the New England Mafia here.

Read more about the case here.






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