Sunday, July 27, 2014

Murderous Mob Turncoats Will Come to Light

Angela Clemente.
We are reprinting a story from Feb. 3 of this year because we have heard new information from a reliable source that a flood of previously classified FBI reports in the process of being made public will identify two high-level informants for the FBI. 

We can only assume that this information has to do with the classified FBI documents being sought by Angela Clemente, a forensic analyst who spent the past 15 years researching the FBI's relationship with mob turncoats. (ANGELA CLEMENT IS NOT OUR SOURCE REGARDING THE NEW INFORMATION.)

According to our source, who would only speak on the condition of anonymity, the documents will prove that two high-level mobsters, one with the Colombos and one with the Gambinos, were high-level informants for the FBI.



Assertions about the Gambino mobster have been published in the past but have been largely overlooked and considered FBI misinformation. As for the identity of the Colombo mobster, we're still reeling.


The two mobsters are high-level, holding boss/underboss positions. The alleged Gambino informant is deceased, the Colombo chieftain is still alive.


Angela Clemente with filmmaker
Joe Berlinger, whose Whitey Bulger
documentary premiered in Boston.
Angela Clemente, a forensic analyst who spent the past 15 years researching the FBI's relationship with mob turncoats, told Cosa Nostra News that she's been able to prove that the FBI "positively" knew that two of its informants, Colombo capo Gregory "The Grim Reaper" Scarpa and soldier Frank "Frankie Blue Eyes" Sparaco, were committing murders while on the Feds' payroll. 

Clemente knows this because the two ratted on each other.

Furthermore, this kind of activity -- turncoats committing violent crimes including murder while working for the Feds -- is ongoing. 

We spoke with Clemente after learning that she'd won her second lawsuit against the FBI.

This time, the ruling regards the pace of access to classified documents regarding alleged systemic corruption between FBI agents and Scarpa, as well as other mob turncoats.

Clemente is suffering from a terminal illness, she noted in filings, and because of this, she needs swifter access to classified FBI documents. Also, the amount of material she has to examine has vastly expanded. The FBI revised upward the number of pages it has that are related to turncoats of interest. The initial figure of 1,420 pages now includes an additional 30,000 pages.

U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan responded by ruling that Clemente deserve access to 5,000 pages a month from the FBI, versus the 2,000 pages a month that the agency was willing to provide.

Judge Thomas Hogan's decision can be found here.

Clemente has waged a campaign to prove that the government had a hand in up to 39 murders committed in New York by turncoat gangsters who were on the payroll. She expects to find additional cases of murders as well as additional cases of turncoats who committed violent crimes while under their FBI handler's purview.

A major focus of her investigation has been FBI Special Agent Roy Lindley DeVecchio and others at the FBI, whom she alleged actively aided or were complicit in covering up murders and additional crimes that Scarpa and other informants committed.

DeVecchio was charged with aiding and abetting four murders in 2006, but the judge dismissed the case after it was revealed that the prosecution's chief witness, Scarpa's wife Linda, lacked credibility.

Speaking to Cosa Nostra News, Clemente revealed that she's "been able to determine... that the FBI positively knew that their informants Frank Sparaco and Gregory Scarpa were committing murders" because the turncoats were ratting out each other.

Clemente also said that FBI agent Christopher Favo was handler to a turncoat who had committed murders.

Other revelations Clemente found: a document showing Scarpa was ordered to pay income tax as an FBI employee, which he never did; as well as another written order to Scarpa not to commit any crimes, which was signed by DeVecchio.

Through her extensive interviews and examination of classified documents Clemente has obtained key information that helped congress in a wide range of cases, including Islamic terrorism, the Kennedy assassination and James "Whitey" Bulger, who many view as the Boston corollary to New York's Scarpa. The Department of Justice Office of Inspector General used Clemente's work when it developed and implemented sweeping changes on informant practices in September 2005.

Bulger was tipped off about a pending arrest and disappeared for decades. He was finally arrested in 2011, and by 2013 was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences for 19 murders, as well as racketeering and other crimes.

Many questions remain. Perhaps the largest one regards the extent of federal and local police corruption that aided Bulger's ability to become the top mobster in New England.

A documentary film has been made about the case. “Whitey v. the United States” was named a Sundance Official selection. Director/producer Joe Berlinger's other film credits include "Paradise Lost," "Brother's Keeper," and "Metallica: Some Kind of Monster."

The film premiered in Boston on January 30th at the Coolidge Theater. Afterwards Clemente took part in a panel discussion in which she spoke about her work.

She told us that the FBI's coddling of murderous mob turncoats is still going on today. "This is not a closed chapter... I am still working on correcting it."

20 comments :

  1. Surprised to learn that congress still has an interest in the JFK assassination. Time to review the "mob hit" theory?

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  2. I thought the informent was John Gotti Jr didnt he have a 302

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  3. two gens back from him, is my information. It's shocking, literally, I won't print the names because I'll be accused of calling good men rats and blackening their reputations. So I won't do it. I report the news, I don't make stuff up (despite what some of "youze" think, as we say on LongIsland).....

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  4. Sure is amazing when the Feds and Mob go to bed togeter isnt it. Philly

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  5. Ed, do you think that in this day and age the fbi would overlook a mobsters crimes if he is only giving them information about terrorist financing?

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  6. my bet is anellio dellacroce for the gambino rat

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  7. Maybe, but what I am talking about goes back to the times of Greg Scarpa Senior. You have to wonder, weren't some of those guys the least bit suspicious... curious? Did someone in the family protect Scarpa against what must have been ongoing speculation within the borgata....?

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  8. u just cant assume thats not right.

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  9. Good to know that someone is still out there going after that treacherous DeVecchio. How these guys can walk free is sickening.

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  10. hi ed philly do u think this little lady is gonna open up a can of worms here or are most these people dead?

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  11. Its not her so much as FBI practice in the rough and tumble days.

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  12. I know its not her but the info from transcripts mention names or are they blacked out thats what i was curious about. Philly

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  13. Two generations back? Aniello Dellacroce and the Times Magazine article back in the 1980's saying he was an informant. Everyone said it was disinformation when it came out. Neil was the underboss.

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  14. Good comparison of Scarpa and Bulger. Both high ranking informants. Both stone cold killers.

    -Mick from Jersey

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  15. Angela's lawsuit is to get complete documents, nothing blacked out. She's getting access to 5,000 pages a month -- of a total of more than 30,000 pages of records.

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  16. I'd say she may already have all the documents by now, in fact. I have to check the specifics of the judge's ruling and how ma.y documents were still outstanding, but I'd say this month or next month she'd have the 30,000 pages.....

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  17. Why Neil, why not Big Paul?

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  18. The Brooklyn DA had a hardon for the FBI and vetted his anger against Devecchio. Instead of doing his homework to insure his information was correct, Hynes took his half-baked case to court. FBI Supervisors had to be smart enough to have public record information (from the excellent crime reporters from the Daily News) to parlay to their sources in daily verbal repartee. To an unintelligent, unstreetwise prosecutor, if would sound like an FBI Agent is giving up FBI law enforcement info when in reality, it was information dug up and publicly reported by the Daily News. The DA's office wanted to indict FBI Agents for conversations the Agents had with informants. DA Hynes was too lazy and unsavy enough to perform a public records search/Newspaper Morgue search. Devecchio had to suffer humiliation because the DA's office was naïve and unprofessional. Devecchio performed brilliantly over his entire career. No good deed goes unpunished!!!!!

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  19. The Brooklyn DA had a hardon for the FBI and vetted his anger against Devecchio. Instead of doing his homework to insure his information was correct, Hynes took his half-baked case to court. FBI Supervisors had to be smart enough to have public record information (from the excellent crime reporters from the Daily News) to parlay to their sources in daily verbal repartee. To an unintelligent, unstreetwise prosecutor, it would sound like an FBI Agent is giving up FBI law enforcement info when in reality, it was information dug up and publicly reported by the Daily News. The DA's office wanted to indict FBI Agents for conversations the Agents had with informants. DA Hynes was too lazy and unsavy enough to perform a public records search/Newspaper Morgue search. Devecchio had to suffer humiliation because the DA's office was naïve and unprofessional. Devecchio performed brilliantly over his entire career. No good deed goes unpunished!!!!!

    see more 0

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  20. Interesting. I've read Lynn's book and am pretty up-to-date on the basic outlines of the case. But the issue here, I believe, is the feds using mad dog sociopaths and looking the other way, or not paying close enough attention to guys like Scarpa and Bulger (and others) who were killing a lot of people while supposedly on a leash. I believe that's the key issue for Angela Clemente, who quite frankly continues working on this case while she's dying of kidney disease. A former detective also has told me he believes the feds dropped the ball. It was actually Jerry Capeci and Tom Robbins who saved Lynn's ass by discrediting a disreputable witness-- that saved DeVecchio. And while Donnie Brasco and lots of fellow FBI agents had Lynn's back, I know of at least one retired agent who believes DeVecchio is guilty as hell. When two informants are squealing on each other about murders and crimes and the feds ignore the info.... I don't see what the Daily News has to do with it, respectfully. However I know some folks have very short memories and I know it's not easy working an informant as brilliant as Scarpa, and he was brilliant to carry on that highwire act as long as he did. Maybe J Edgar Hoover was right in some respects about this being dirty business....

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